AtA: Wacky Antics and Chair Alternatives

Posted May 31st, 2010 in Ask the Author by Clint

Alrighty, so I read the e-book, and I really enjoyed the information and presentation and will definitely start giving in to my whacky side more by skipping to class and the like.

I don’t want to dissuade your originality or individualism in any way, but if you want to get some leverage on yourself and make things interesting, you might consider doing ‘whacky’ stuff with a buddy. Not only is it fun and motivating to have someone to race, but herd mentality suggests that if there is one person doing something out of the ordinary, people view that person with skepticism and suspicion. But if you go screaming by with a friend (or two), it makes people question if in fact you’re doing the right thing and they’re screwing up somehow.

Be sure to link the news article if you somehow get a majority of people on campus to dash frantically between classes. You trendsetter you.

But I have one question, what would you suggest as an alternate to a chair?

This is both an excellent question and a seemingly never-ending frustration to me. I have tried all manner of ergonomic chairs, kneeling chairs, silly bosu-ball chair things, even hammocks, beanbags, and recliners. I also know more than one trainer who puts their laptop on a tall shelf or bar and just stands up while they use the computer. The fact most people generally lean forward to get at the computer only complicates matters. But I am still searching for something that biomechanically makes sense.

At present, I personally have a regular ergonomic office chair approved by various back-health organizations, but truth be told I probably spend half of my time with my feet in it, squatting. Like right now. I’m not even kidding.

Since using a computer is typically the easiest way to be stuck in a chair for long periods, the best trick I can suggest at this point is to simply alter your position frequently, and also to stand up when you can. If you’re not interacting with the keyboard at any given moment, standing up, turning around, squatting down, doing any sort of movement that helps break up a static, prolonged position is probably the best damage control you can do.